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The Surfing Lifestyle - info

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The Surfing Lifestyle - info Surfing is one of the oldest practiced sports on the planet. The art of wave riding, is a blend of total athleticism and the comprehension of the beauty and power of nature. Surfing is also one of the few sports that creates its own culture and lifestyle. The act of riding waves with a wooden board originated in Western Polynesia over three thousand years ago. The first surfers were fishermen who discovered riding waves as an efficient method of getting to shore with their catch . Eventually catching waves developed from being part of everyday work to being a pastime. This change revolutionized surfing. There is no exact record of when stand-up surfing became a sport. It is known that during the 15th century, kings, queens and people of the Sandwich Isles were big into the sport of "he'enalu" or wave-sliding, in old Hawaiian,. "He'e" means to change from a solid form to a liquid form and "nalu" refers to the surfing motion of a wave. Early historical records of surfing appear in the late 1700s, when Europeans and Polynesians made first contact in Tahiti. Navigator Captain James Cook described how a Tahitian caught waves with his outrigger canoe just for the fun of it: "On walking one day about Matavai Point, where our tents were erected, I saw a man paddling in a small canoe so quickly and looking about him with such eagerness of each side. He then sat motionless and was carried along at the same swift rate as the wave, till it landed him upon the beach. Then he started out, emptied his canoe, and went in search of another swell. I could not help concluding that this man felt the most supreme pleasure while he was driven on so fast and so smoothly by the sea." The first Polynesian settlers to land in Hawaii were most likely skilled in simple surfing, and after a few hundred years of riding the waves of Hawaii, the well-known Hawaiian form of the sport emerged. The Hawaiians who surfed, the ali'i or high class, claimed the highest reputation for skill with boards on waves. They developed their own prayers, board shapers, wood and beaches where a select few could surf with people of their talent. No one dared to drop in on their wave in fear of getting punished and possible dying. The surfboards underwent a sacred ritual before construction. Only three types of trees were picked to make a board. The board maker would dig up the tree and around the roots place fish in the hole as an offering to the gods for the tree. The process of shaping then began. Surfing's comeback from near extinction was a result of a few factors, but mainly due to the influence of certain natives on the scene at the time. Known as the "Father of Modern Surfing," Duke Kahanamoku was an Olympic swimmer who started a surf club on Wakiki Beach. Duke swam in exhibitions and swimming meets in Europe and the United States. His popularity attracted attention on the West Coast and Southern Californians became interested in surfing. There was a myth that only a Hawaiian could acheive balance while standing and riding a wave. Despite this belief, in the early 1900's, a number of Honolulu residents, both natives and Caucasians, re-discovered the waves at Waikiki, and gradually the interest was renewed. By the 1930’s, surfers were no longer satified with simple wave riding. Their ambitons overpowered the equipment they had been using. Ever since then the surfboard was the focus - "pushing technology and design to provide boards that could match surfers' skills." Tom Blake was one of the pioneers of reinventing surfboards. His Hallow Hawaiian Board weighed half of what traditional boards weighed at the time. The lighter board was controversial in competitions, but recognized as a success. In those years, builders were experimenting with all sorts of sizes, shapes, weights, and materials. Blake had another innovation to add a small fin on the bottom, underside of the board. This helped in turning and cutting through the wave. World War II helped in the discovery of certain chemicals and materials that kept boards together. surfers now had waterproof glues that kept the pieces together without having to use bolts running from rail to rail. Fiberglass, resin, and styrofoam also came out of research during WWII. An ritual created by the revival of the sport was the Surf Safari. The introduction of the automobile made it easier for surfers to go up and down the coast of California in search of good waves. The Golden Age of surfing was the 1950s. After the war, many people enjoyed prosperity and leisure time. Beach movies, surf fashion and a show called Gidget helped commercialize the sport and reinvent the lifsetyle. Surfing had gone from an elite and scared island activity to a multi-million dollar industry. The Surfing Lifestyle - info "The best surfer out there is the one having the most fun." Phil Edwards "Out of water, I am nothing." Duke Kahanamoku "My passion for surfing was more than my fear of sharks." Bethany Hamilton "Surfing is attitude dancing." Gerry Lopez "We're all equal before a wave." Laird Hamilton "Surfing's one of the few sports that you look ahead to see what's behind." Laird Hamilton "The biggest sin in the world would be if I lost my love for the ocean." Laird Hamilton "Wiping out is an underappreciated skill." Laird Hamilton "It's like the mafia. Once you're in - your in. There's no getting out." Kelly Slater "Your surfing can get better on every turn, on every wave you catch. Learn to read the ocean better. A big part of my success has been wave knowledge." Kelly Slater "It's all about where your mind's at" Kelly Slater "The joy of surfing is so many things combined, from the physical exertion of it, to the challenge of it, to the mental side of the sport." Kelly Slater "I think when a surfer becomes a surfer, it's almost like an obligation to be an environmentalist at the same time." Kelly Slater "I'm just a surfer who wanted to build something that would allow me to surf longer." Jack O'Neill "I took off on a wave, went down the side, popped out the other end, and went, shit, I'm still alive!" Greg Noll "It's a culmination of your life of surfing when you turn and paddle in at Mavericks." Jeff Clark "I surf to get tan." Shane Dorian "If you're having a bad day, catch a wave." Frosty Hesson "If in doubt, paddle out." Nat Young "It's not tragic to die doing something you love." Mark Foo "Eddie would go." Mark Foo

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The Surfing Lifestyle - info Surfing is one of the oldest practiced sports on the planet. The art of wave riding, is a blend of total athleticism and the comprehension of the beauty and power of nature. Surfing is also one of the few sports that creates its own culture and lifestyle. The act of riding waves with a wooden board originated in Western Polynesia over three thousand years ago. The first surfers were fishermen who discovered riding waves as an efficient method of getting to shore with their catch . Eventually catching waves developed from being part of everyday work to being a pastime. This change revolutionized surfing. There is no exact record of when stand-up surfing became a sport. It is known that during the 15th century, kings, queens and people of the Sandwich Isles were big into the sport of "he'enalu" or wave-sliding, in old Hawaiian,. "He'e" means to change from a solid form to a liquid form and "nalu" refers to the surfing motion of a wave. Early historical records of surfing appear in the late 1700s, when Europeans and Polynesians made first contact in Tahiti. Navigator Captain James Cook described how a Tahitian caught waves with his outrigger canoe just for the fun of it: "On walking one day about Matavai Point, where our tents were erected, I saw a man paddling in a small canoe so quickly and looking about him with such eagerness of each side. He then sat motionless and was carried along at the same swift rate as the wave, till it landed him upon the beach. Then he started out, emptied his canoe, and went in search of another swell. I could not help concluding that this man felt the most supreme pleasure while he was driven on so fast and so smoothly by the sea." The first Polynesian settlers to land in Hawaii were most likely skilled in simple surfing, and after a few hundred years of riding the waves of Hawaii, the well-known Hawaiian form of the sport emerged. The Hawaiians who surfed, the ali'i or high class, claimed the highest reputation for skill with boards on waves. They developed their own prayers, board shapers, wood and beaches where a select few could surf with people of their talent. No one dared to drop in on their wave in fear of getting punished and possible dying. The surfboards underwent a sacred ritual before construction. Only three types of trees were picked to make a board. The board maker would dig up the tree and around the roots place fish in the hole as an offering to the gods for the tree. The process of shaping then began. Surfing's comeback from near extinction was a result of a few factors, but mainly due to the influence of certain natives on the scene at the time. Known as the "Father of Modern Surfing," Duke Kahanamoku was an Olympic swimmer who started a surf club on Wakiki Beach. Duke swam in exhibitions and swimming meets in Europe and the United States. His popularity attracted attention on the West Coast and Southern Californians became interested in surfing. There was a myth that only a Hawaiian could acheive balance while standing and riding a wave. Despite this belief, in the early 1900's, a number of Honolulu residents, both natives and Caucasians, re-discovered the waves at Waikiki, and gradually the interest was renewed. By the 1930’s, surfers were no longer satified with simple wave riding. Their ambitons overpowered the equipment they had been using. Ever since then the surfboard was the focus - "pushing technology and design to provide boards that could match surfers' skills." Tom Blake was one of the pioneers of reinventing surfboards. His Hallow Hawaiian Board weighed half of what traditional boards weighed at the time. The lighter board was controversial in competitions, but recognized as a success. In those years, builders were experimenting with all sorts of sizes, shapes, weights, and materials. Blake had another innovation to add a small fin on the bottom, underside of the board. This helped in turning and cutting through the wave. World War II helped in the discovery of certain chemicals and materials that kept boards together. surfers now had waterproof glues that kept the pieces together without having to use bolts running from rail to rail. Fiberglass, resin, and styrofoam also came out of research during WWII. An ritual created by the revival of the sport was the Surf Safari. The introduction of the automobile made it easier for surfers to go up and down the coast of California in search of good waves. The Golden Age of surfing was the 1950s. After the war, many people enjoyed prosperity and leisure time. Beach movies, surf fashion and a show called Gidget helped commercialize the sport and reinvent the lifsetyle. Surfing had gone from an elite and scared island activity to a multi-million dollar industry. The Surfing Lifestyle - info "The best surfer out there is the one having the most fun." Phil Edwards "Out of water, I am nothing." Duke Kahanamoku "My passion for surfing was more than my fear of sharks." Bethany Hamilton "Surfing is attitude dancing." Gerry Lopez "We're all equal before a wave." Laird Hamilton "Surfing's one of the few sports that you look ahead to see what's behind." Laird Hamilton "The biggest sin in the world would be if I lost my love for the ocean." Laird Hamilton "Wiping out is an underappreciated skill." Laird Hamilton "It's like the mafia. Once you're in - your in. There's no getting out." Kelly Slater "Your surfing can get better on every turn, on every wave you catch. Learn to read the ocean better. A big part of my success has been wave knowledge." Kelly Slater "It's all about where your mind's at" Kelly Slater "The joy of surfing is so many things combined, from the physical exertion of it, to the challenge of it, to the mental side of the sport." Kelly Slater "I think when a surfer becomes a surfer, it's almost like an obligation to be an environmentalist at the same time." Kelly Slater "I'm just a surfer who wanted to build something that would allow me to surf longer." Jack O'Neill "I took off on a wave, went down the side, popped out the other end, and went, shit, I'm still alive!" Greg Noll "It's a culmination of your life of surfing when you turn and paddle in at Mavericks." Jeff Clark "I surf to get tan." Shane Dorian "If you're having a bad day, catch a wave." Frosty Hesson "If in doubt, paddle out." Nat Young "It's not tragic to die doing something you love." Mark Foo "Eddie would go." Mark Foo

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